Graffiti

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Item #: CD-SUND-5623 -

    A heady and adventurous experience with ever-shifting elements of jazz, fuzz guitar, blues rock and psychedelia! Graffiti’s origins can be traced back to 1967 and the dissolution of The Hangmen, a popular Washington DC area garage rock act well noted for the proto-punk stylings of their singles “What A Girl Can’t Do” and “Faces.” Singer Tony Taylor, a late addition to the band’s lineup, recruited guitarist George Strunz to the group and soon announced the band would pursue a more psychedelic...

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    Item #: LP-SUND-5623C -

      A heady and adventurous experience with ever-shifting elements of jazz, fuzz guitar, blues rock and psychedelia! Graffiti’s origins can be traced back to 1967 and the dissolution of The Hangmen, a popular Washington DC area garage rock act well noted for the proto-punk stylings of their singles “What A Girl Can’t Do” and “Faces.” Singer Tony Taylor, a late addition to the band’s lineup, recruited guitarist George Strunz to the group and soon announced the band would pursue a more psychedelic...

      A heady and adventurous experience with ever-shifting elements of jazz, fuzz guitar, blues rock and psychedelia!

      Graffiti’s origins can be traced back to 1967 and the dissolution of The Hangmen, a popular Washington DC area garage rock act well noted for the proto-punk stylings of their singles “What A Girl Can’t Do” and “Faces.” Singer Tony Taylor, a late addition to the band’s lineup, recruited guitarist George Strunz to the group and soon announced the band would pursue a more psychedelic direction. It didn’t take long for Graffiti to attract label attention, and by August of 1968 the band signed to ABC Records and released their debut single, “He’s Got The Knack.” In November of 1968 they released their one and only album.

      The juxtaposition between Graffiti’s smooth vocal harmonies and their intricate songwriting is stark. One moment the group is immersed in all of the feel-good pop songwriting tropes of the era, oftentimes quite reminiscent of acts like The Association and The Mamas & The Papas. Meanwhile, the next moment sees the band vamping into extended passages, odd chord sequencing, and off beat time signatures, highlighted by Strunz’s frequent fuzz laced soloing and the energetic drumming of Richie Blakin.