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    Five must have Byrds LPs in one vinyl bundle!

    Includes the following albums:

    • Mr. Tambourine Man - LP 5197
    • Sweetheart Of The Rodeo - LP 5215
    • Sanctuary - LP 5061
    • The Notorious Byrd Brothers - LP 5201
    • Live At Royal Albert Hall 1971 - LP 5189

    The Byrds burst upon an already fertile pop/rock music scene in the spring of 1965 with a stunning retooling of Bob Dylan's "Mr. Tambourine Man" that changed everything. The debut album of the same name that followed, featuring mindblowing folk-rock gems like "The Bells Of Rhymney," "I'll Feel A Whole Lot Better" and "Chimes Of Freedom," was so aromatically intoxicating it even lit a fire under the Beatles across the Atlantic, beavering away on Rubber Soul.

    With one mighty swing of the axe, the Byrds changed not only the face of rock 'n' roll but country music, as well, with their sixth album, 1968's Sweetheart Of The Rodeo. Tired of dipping a toe into the genre, Roger McGuinn and Chris Hillman added singer Gram Parsons and drummer Kevin Kelley and went for total immersion. The baptism of country-rock was a natural with Parsons, former International Submarine Band frontman, now on board.

    The ringing sound of the Byrds - a band that created at least three rock 'n' roll genres (folk-rock, raga-rock and country-rock) would make any red-blooded music fan reach for the nearest tambourine to beat the jingle-jangle daylights out of it. Sanctuary collects all of the best rarities, alternate takes and 45-only sides into one goose pimple-inducing package, guaranteed to make anyone with a pulse "Feel A Whole Lot Better." Most tracks have never before appeared on vinyl!

    The Byrds pull no punches kicking off their fifth album, 1968's The Notorious Byrd Brothers, with "Artificial Energy," a devastating haymaker aimed at the go-fast generation. In the blink of an eye, they're into the most beautiful baroque folk-rock ever created, the Carole King/Gerry Goffin-penned "Goin' Back." It was the song that caused David Crosby to leave the band (witness the empty horse stall on the cover photo) an odd reaction, considering most of Notorious was layered with a phased and eerie deep-space vibe that seemed to come from another galaxy.

    Rescued from a tape that had sat forgotten in McGuinn?s climatized garage for decades, this stellar 1971 set, featuring live versions of the current band?s studio faves (?Lover of the Bayou,? ?Chestnut Mare?) as well as adventurous reworkings of Byrds classics (?Mr. Tambourine Man,? ?My Back Pages,? ?Eight Miles High,??So You Want to Be a Rock?n?Roll Star?) might be the most accurate and stirring live performance yet of the legendary Los Angeles combo. By 1971, the guitar interplay of McGuinn andWhite had become a jaw-dropping highlight of their live performances,as had their stripped down, acoustic mini-set and peerless four-part vocal harmonies.